Goodbye Summer. We barely knew you this year. We only reached 100 degrees or higher 11 days this summer in Midland, and 9 days in Odessa. The record still stands at 53 from 2011. Last year it was plenty more--not to mention next to NO rain and very low humidity compared to this summer. Everything was brown as usual last year--but a very lush green this year with all the rain. And with all that came the BUGS. Especially flies and mosquitos. Good times. But sitting on my patio at 7:46 pm as I write this--with this view from my chair in the back yard and a wonderful West Texas breeze to go with it--it's glorious.

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Not sure if we'll get any more days this fall where it will be warm enough for pool weather-so hopefully you've gotten that all out of your system for the year. Not even sure how much longer communities are keeping their pools open, for that matter. So it's time to start thinking of the backyard firepit visits with family and friends on weekends, and for warmer clothes like long-sleeved T's, hoodies, and jeans taking the place of short sleeve shirts and shorts with flip flops.

I keep hearing that the Farmers Almanac, which predicted we would have the bad winter we had this past February with the Power Grid taking a dive--predicts ANOTHER bd one this coming season as well. I sure hope they've taken the time to reinforce the power grid because I don't think we can take another week like we had last winter. For now--sit outside as much as you can and enjoy our beautiful fall. Here's hoping that NEXT summer the weather is closer to what it was in 2020 and we can get back to feeling more like West Texas!

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