It's considered one of the most infamous urban legends, but is there any truth to the story of the headless ghost bride in the upper areas of the Old Faithful Inn in western Wyoming? As the saying goes, where there is smoke you'll often times find fire.

I've heard this story before, but I wanted to dig to see if there's any reality connected to the headless ghost bride of the Old Faithful Inn. I've found various sources and they all seem to tell the same story. In a nutshell, here are the facts which are backed up by Yellowstone Park.com:

1. A young woman in New York wanted to marry an older servant instead of the man her father had chosen. They married in 1915 and honeymooned in Yellowstone National Park.

2. The young woman and her new husband checked into room 127 of the Old Faithful Inn.

3. The couple almost immediately began to have violent arguments. One of those arguments led the man to leave the Old Faithful Inn.

4. After 2 days, the staff found the young woman's body without a head in the room 127 bathtub. Her head was found in the Crow's Nest of the Old Faithful Inn.

The story doesn't end with that tragedy. According to American Folklore, soon thereafter sightings began around midnight when a worker heard noises from what they thought was near the ceiling of the Old Faithful Inn. They were horrified when they saw a headless woman descending the stairs holding her head in her arms.

American Ghost Stories claims to have shared a picture captured with a thermal vision camera of the headless young woman. While I'm not buying that it's legit, they do corroborate the stories told by guests who say they've seen the entity.

The Crow's Nest has not been accessible by the general public after it was damaged by the 1959 Hebgen Lake earthquake without special permission. It's inaccessibility has not stopped the sightings of what might be a somber spirit searching for the man who allegedly took her life more than 100 years ago.

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