Voices are getting louder and louder for a 4 day work week nationwide. There are countries where this topic is in discussion, and at least one where the switch has already been made and it's working. Companies are participating in studies on worker productivity, including information on the reduced of employees calling in sick with the shorter week and the facts that show lower overhead costs.

Stories recently broke about Japan considering the switch to allow workers to have more personal time amid the birthing rate slow down. They want to allow people more free time to meet, fall in love and start a family. Recent stories have also discussed the same birthing slow down here at home in the US as well. Spain is also testing the shorter week. Iceland has been doing this successfully for a while now as three quarters of the population there are on the 4 day a week plan.

There has also been a lot of discussion on this topic since the pandemic had most of us working from home last year. The countries that are either on this plan or testing it say pay hasn't declined and worker productivity is way up. The push for a better quality of life is certainly something companies worldwide are going to have to pay attention to. With time being the biggest and most valued commodity nowadays-and demands on our time at an all time high--something needs to give. If you're one of those who thinks this is a great idea and would like to see if your workplace would consider giving it a try--HERE is a great article from Owl Labs on how to approach the topic with those in charge. I think it's a matter of time before the US follows suit but the movement has to gain more steam. People everywhere feel overworked and tired and it's a great time in the world, with the pandemic largely in the rearview mirror--to re-evaluate the "norm".

 

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